NYT report on ISEZ 2006, attended by project staff

Tackling the Animal-to-Human Link in Illness

Authors: Lawrence K. Altman

Journal: New York Times

Year: 2006

ISSN: 0362-4331

Canary Database P.I. Peter Rabinowitz, M.D., attended the recent International Symposium on Emerging Zoonoses 2006 conference in Atlanta. The event was written up in the New York Times:

“Stronger ties between veterinarians and physicians are needed to prevent further outbreaks of the animal diseases that have caused deaths and serious illness among humans in many countries in recent years, international health officials said at a meeting here.”

Tags: zoonoses isez symposium

Canary Database P.I. Peter Rabinowitz, M.D., attended the recent <a href="http://www.isezconference.org/home.htm">International Symposium on Emerging Zoonoses 2006</a> conference in Atlanta. The event was written up in the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/25/health/25infect.html">New York Times</a>:

<blockquote>"Stronger ties between veterinarians and physicians are needed to prevent further outbreaks of the animal diseases that have caused deaths and serious illness among humans in many countries in recent years, international health officials said at a meeting here."</blockquote>zoonoses isez symposium

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New Article: Animals as Sentinels of Bioterrorism Agents

Animals as Sentinels of Bioterrorism Agents

Authors: Rabinowitz P, Gordon Z, Chudnov D, Wilcox M, Odofin L, Liu A, et al.

Journal: Emerg Infect Dis.

Year: 2006 Volume: 12 Issue: 4

ISSN: 1080-6059

Our latest publication is now available online!

Abstract:

“We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1966 to 2005 to determine whether animals could provide early warning of a bioterrorism attack, serve as markers for ongoing exposure risk, and amplify or propagate a bioterrorism outbreak. We found evidence that, for certain bioterrorism agents, pets, wildlife, or livestock could provide early warning and that for other agents, humans would likely manifest symptoms before illness could be detected in animals. After an acute attack, active surveillance of wild or domestic animal populations could help identify many ongoing exposure risks. If certain bioterrorism agents found their way into animal populations, they could spread widely through animal-to-animal transmission and prove difficult to control. The public health infrastructure must look beyond passive surveillance of acute animal disease events to build capacity for active surveillance and intervention efforts to detect and control ongoing outbreaks of disease in domestic and wild animal populations.”

Our latest publication is now available online!

Abstract:
<blockquote>"We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1966 to 2005 to determine whether animals could provide early warning of a bioterrorism attack, serve as markers for ongoing exposure risk, and amplify or propagate a bioterrorism outbreak. We found evidence that, for certain bioterrorism agents, pets, wildlife, or livestock could provide early warning and that for other agents, humans would likely manifest symptoms before illness could be detected in animals. After an acute attack, active surveillance of wild or domestic animal populations could help identify many ongoing exposure risks. If certain bioterrorism agents found their way into animal populations, they could spread widely through animal-to-animal transmission and prove difficult to control. The public health infrastructure must look beyond passive surveillance of acute animal disease events to build capacity for active surveillance and intervention efforts to detect and control ongoing outbreaks of disease in domestic and wild animal populations."</blockquote>

Create an account to save records, sets

New at canarydatabase.org is the ability to save records that interest you. Registered users can save any record with a single click, and can save records into different sets however you like. For example, if you’re studying sheep as sentinel animals, and separately preparing a paper on animals as sentinels of bioterrorism, you could create one set for each — “sheep”, and “bioterrorism”, and then save any records you find in the database to one, the other, or both sets. All with just a few quick clicks!

Viewing saved records and sets

To get started, register for an account using the link at left. Check your email inbox for a verification message, and when you’ve followed its instructions (they’re easy, we promise!), log in to the site.

Now that you’re logged in, you’ll see checkboxes next to all the records you find in the database. Click them to save them… it’s that easy!

To review your saved records, or limit a search to only your saved records, click on the link for My page at left. You’ll be able to see and search your records right there, and from here you can also get started creating sets.

Saving records in sets is just as easy as saving records… click a record you want to save, and your sets will automatically be listed right there under the record. Click the set name to save it into, and you’re done!

It’s all easy, useful, and best of all… it’s free!